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Response Parameters for SMS Text Message Assessments Among Pregnant and General Smokers Participating in SMS Cessation Trials

Overview of attention for article published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, December 2015
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Citations

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Title
Response Parameters for SMS Text Message Assessments Among Pregnant and General Smokers Participating in SMS Cessation Trials
Published in
Nicotine & Tobacco Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv266
Pubmed ID
Authors

Felix Naughton, Muhammad Riaz, Stephen Sutton

Abstract

Despite a substantial increase in use of SMS text messages for collecting smoking-related data, there is limited knowledge on the parameters of response. This study assessed response rates, response speed, impact of reminders and predictors of response to text message assessments among smokers. Data were from two SMS cessation intervention trials using clinical samples of pregnant (n = 198) and general smokers (n = 293) sent text message assessments during 3-month cessation programs. Response rates were calculated using data from the host web-server. Changes in response over time, impact of reminders and potential demographic (age, gender, ethnicity, parity, and deprivation) and smoking (nicotine dependence, determination to quit, prenatal smoking history, smoking status at follow-up) predictors of response were analyzed. Mean response rates were 61.9% (pregnant) and 67.8% (general) with aggregated median response times of 0.35 (pregnant) and 0.64 (general) hours. Response rate reduced over time (P = .003) for general smokers only. Text message reminders had a significant effect on response (Ps < .001), with observed mean increases of 13.8% (pregnant) and 17.7% (general). Age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.00) and deprivation (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-1.00) weakly predicted response among pregnant smokers and nonsmoking status at 4 weeks follow-up (OR = 8.63, 95% CI 3.03-24.58) predicted response among general smokers. Text message assessments within trial-based cessation programs yield rapid responses from a sizable proportion of smokers, which can be increased using text reminders. While few sources of nonresponse bias were identified for general smokers, older and more deprived pregnant women were less likely to respond. This study demonstrates that most pregnant and general smokers enrolled in a cessation trial will respond to a small number of questions about their smoking sent by text message, mostly within 1 hour of being sent the assessment text message. For those who do not initially respond, our findings suggest that 24- and 48-hour text message reminders are likely to increase response a small but meaningful amount. However, older age and higher deprivation among pregnant smokers and relapse among general smokers is likely to reduce the chance of response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Unspecified 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,082,723
of 12,029,028 outputs
Outputs from Nicotine & Tobacco Research
#1,229
of 1,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,990
of 335,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nicotine & Tobacco Research
#19
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,029,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,299 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.