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THE INFLUENCE OF END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION ON THYROID HORMONES

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos de Gastroenterologia, June 2015
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Title
THE INFLUENCE OF END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION ON THYROID HORMONES
Published in
Arquivos de Gastroenterologia, June 2015
DOI 10.1590/s0004-28032015000200009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karla Rocha PENTEADO, Júlio Cezar Uili COELHO, Mônica Beatriz PAROLIN, Jorge Eduardo Fouto MATIAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de FREITAS

Abstract

Background Thyroid dysfunction has been reported in most chronic illnesses including severe liver disease. These defects in thyroid hormone metabolism result in the sick euthyroid syndrome, also known as low T3 syndrome. Objectives Our objective was to evaluate the thyroid function in patients with end stage liver disease prior and after deceased donor liver transplantation and to correlate thyroid hormonal changes with the MELD score (Model for End stage Liver Disease). Methods In a prospective study, serum levels of thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone TSH), total thyroxine (tT4), free thyroxine (fT4) and triiodothyronine (T3) from 30 male adult patients with end stage liver disease were measured two to four hours before and 6 months after liver transplantation (LT). MELD was determined on the day of transplant. For this analysis, extra points were not added for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results The patients had normal TSH and fT4 levels before LT and there was no change after the procedure. Total thyroxine and triiodothyronine were within the normal range before LT, except for four patients (13.3%) whose values were lower. Both hormones increased to normal values in all four patients after LT (P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively). When the patients were divided into two groups (MELD <18 and MELD >18), it was observed that there was no change in the TSH, freeT4, and total T4 levels in both groups after LT. Although there was no significant variation in the level of T3 in MELD <18 group (P=0.055), there was an increase in the MELD >18 group after LT (P=0.003). Conclusion Patients with end stage liver disease subjected to liver transplantation had normal TSH and fT4 levels before and after LT. In a few patients with lower tT4 and T3 levels before LT, the level of these hormones increased to normal after LT.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2016.
All research outputs
#11,136,561
of 12,520,820 outputs
Outputs from Arquivos de Gastroenterologia
#123
of 142 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#290,383
of 352,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arquivos de Gastroenterologia
#3
of 3 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 142 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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