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Evaluating medical student engagement during virtual patient simulations: a sequential, mixed methods study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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91 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating medical student engagement during virtual patient simulations: a sequential, mixed methods study
Published in
BMC Medical Education, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0530-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lise McCoy, Robin K. Pettit, Joy H. Lewis, J. Aaron Allgood, Curt Bay, Frederic N. Schwartz

Abstract

Student engagement is an important domain for medical education, however, it is difficult to quantify. The goal of this study was to investigate the utility of virtual patient simulations (VPS) for increasing medical student engagement. Our aims were specifically to investigate how and to what extent the VPS foster student engagement. This study took place at A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (ATSU-SOMA), in the USA. First year medical students (n = 108) worked in teams to complete a series of four in-class virtual patient case studies. Student engagement was measured, defined as flow, interest, and relevance. These dimensions were measured using four data collection instruments: researcher observations, classroom photographs, tutor feedback, and an electronic exit survey. Qualitative data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Triangulation of findings between the four data sources indicate that VPS foster engagement in three facets: 1) Flow. In general, students enjoyed the activities, and were absorbed in the task at hand. 2) Interest. Students demonstrated interest in the activities, as evidenced by enjoyment, active discussion, and humor. Students remarked upon elements that caused cognitive dissonance: excessive text and classroom noise generated by multi-media and peer conversations. 3) Relevance. VPS were relevant, in terms of situational clinical practice, exam preparation, and obtaining concrete feedback on clinical decisions. Researchers successfully introduced a new learning platform into the medical school curriculum. The data collected during this study were also used to improve new learning modules and techniques associated with implementing them in the classroom. Results of this study assert that virtual patient simulations foster engagement in terms of flow, relevance, and interest.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
Ecuador 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 86 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Student > Master 14 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Researcher 11 12%
Unspecified 10 11%
Other 30 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 29%
Unspecified 20 22%
Computer Science 11 12%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Psychology 8 9%
Other 16 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,034,808
of 6,997,887 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#656
of 1,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,241
of 314,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#44
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,997,887 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,110 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,620 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.