↓ Skip to main content

Can the Neighborhood Built Environment Make a Difference in Children's Development? Building the Research Agenda to Create Evidence for Place-Based Children's Policy

Overview of attention for article published in Academic Pediatrics, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Can the Neighborhood Built Environment Make a Difference in Children's Development? Building the Research Agenda to Create Evidence for Place-Based Children's Policy
Published in
Academic Pediatrics, January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.acap.2015.09.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Villanueva, Hannah Badland, Amanda Kvalsvig, Meredith O'Connor, Hayley Christian, Geoffrey Woolcock, Billie Giles-Corti, Sharon Goldfeld

Abstract

Healthy child development is determined by a combination of physical, social, family, individual, and environmental factors. Thus far, the majority of child development research has focused on the influence of individual, family and school environments, and largely ignored the neighborhood context despite the increasing policy interest. Yet given that neighborhoods are the locations where children spend large periods of time outside of home and school, it is plausible the physical design of neighborhoods (built environment), including access to local amenities, can impact on child development. The relatively few studies exploring this relationship support associations between child development and neighborhood destinations, green spaces, interaction with nature, traffic exposure, and housing density. These studies emphasise the need to more deeply understand how child development outcomes might be influenced by the neighborhood built environment. Pursuing this research space is well aligned with the current global movements on 'livable' and 'child-friendly' cities. It has direct public policy impact by informing planning policies across a range of sectors (urban design and planning, transport, public health, and pediatrics) to implement place-based interventions and initiatives that target children's health and livable development at the community-level. This paper argues the importance of exploring the effect of the neighborhood built environment on child development as a crucial first step towards informing urban design principle to help reduce developmental vulnerability in children, and set optimal child development trajectories early.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Australia 2 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Unknown 198 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 46 22%
Student > Master 45 22%
Researcher 28 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 9%
Other 12 6%
Other 36 17%
Unknown 22 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 69 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 9%
Environmental Science 19 9%
Arts and Humanities 11 5%
Other 36 17%
Unknown 32 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,504,553
of 11,817,206 outputs
Outputs from Academic Pediatrics
#123
of 648 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,176
of 341,707 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Academic Pediatrics
#3
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,817,206 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 648 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,707 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.