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Effect of supplementation of allicin on methanogenesis and ruminal microbial flora in Dorper crossbred ewes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, January 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of supplementation of allicin on methanogenesis and ruminal microbial flora in Dorper crossbred ewes
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40104-015-0057-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tao Ma, Dandan Chen, Yan Tu, Naifeng Zhang, Bingwen Si, Kaidong Deng, Qiyu Diao

Abstract

Garlic extracts have been reported to be effective in reducing methanogenesis. Related mechanisms are not well illustrated, however, and most studies have been conducted in vitro. This study investigates the effects of supplementary allicin (AL) in sheep diet on in vivo digestibility, rumen fermentation, and shifts of microbial flora. Two experiments were conducted using Dorper × thin-tailed Han crossbred ewes. In experiment 1, eighteen ewes (60.0 ± 1.73 kg BW) were randomly assigned for 29 days to either of two dietary treatments: a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with 2.0 g AL/head·day to investigate supplementary AL on nutrient digestibility and methane emissions. In experiment 2, six ewes (65.2 ± 2.0 kg BW) with ruminal canulas were assigned to the same two dietary treatments as in experiment 1 for 42 days to investigate supplementary AL on ruminal fermentation and microbial flora. The methane emissions were determined using an open-circuit respirometry system and microbial assessment was done by qPCR of 16S rRNA genes. Supplementary AL increased the apparent digestibility of organic matter (P < 0.001), nitrogen (P = 0.006), neutral detergent fiber (P < 0.001), and acid detergent fiber (P = 0.002). Fecal nitrogen output was reduced (P = 0.001) but urinary nitrogen output was unaffected (P = 0.691), while nitrogen retention (P = 0.077) and nitrogen retention/nitrogen intake (P = 0.077) tended to increase. Supplementary AL decreased methane emissions scaled to metabolic bodyweight by 5.95 % (P = 0.007) and to digestible organic matter intake by 8.36 % (P = 0.009). Ruminal pH was unaffected (P = 0.601) while ammonia decreased (P = 0.024) and total volatile fatty acids increased (P = 0.024) in response to supplementary AL. Supplementary AL decreased the population of methanogens (P = 0.001) and tended to decrease that of protozoans (P = 0.097), but increased the populations of F. succinogenes (P < 0.001), R. flavefaciens (P = 0.001), and B. fibrisolvens (P = 0.001). Supplementation of AL at 2.0 g/head·day effectively enhanced OM, N, NDF, and ADF digestibility and reduced daily methane emissions (L/kg BW(0.75)) in ewes, probably by decreasing the population of ruminal protozoans and methanogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 29%
Researcher 7 25%
Student > Master 5 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Professor 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 68%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2016.
All research outputs
#9,637,998
of 12,554,960 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#209
of 273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,106
of 331,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#12
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,554,960 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 273 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,436 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.