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Evaluation of psychometric properties and factorial structure of the pre-school child behaviour checklist at the Kenyan Coast

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, January 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 peer review site
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluation of psychometric properties and factorial structure of the pre-school child behaviour checklist at the Kenyan Coast
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13034-015-0089-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Symon M. Kariuki, Amina Abubakar, Elizabeth Murray, Alan Stein, Charles R. J. C. Newton

Abstract

Behavioural/emotional problems may be common in preschool children living in resource-poor settings, but assessment of these problems in preschool children from poor areas is challenging owing to lack of appropriate behavioural screening tools. The child behaviour checklist (CBCL) is widely known for its reliability in identifying behavioural/emotional problems in preschool children, but it has not been validated for use in sub-Saharan Africa. With permission from developers of CBCL, we translated this tool into Ki-Swahili and adapted the items to make them culturally appropriate and contextually relevant and examined the psychometric properties of the CBCL, particularly reliability, validity and factorial structure in a Kenyan community preschool sample of 301 children. It was also re-administered after 2 weeks to 38 randomly selected respondents, for the purpose of evaluating retest reliability. To evaluate inter-informant reliability, the CBCL was administered to 46 respondents (17 alternative caretakers and 29 fathers) alongside the child's mother. Generalised linear model was used to measure associations with behavioural/emotional scores. We used structural equation modelling to perform a confirmatory factor analysis to examine the seven-syndrome CBCL structure. During the first phase we found that most of the items could be adequately translated and easily understood by the participants. The inter-informant agreement for CBCL scores was excellent between the mothers and other caretakers [Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) = 0.89, p < 0.001] and fathers (r = 0.81; p < 0.001). The test-retest reliability was acceptable (r = 0.76; p < 0.001). The scale internal consistency coefficients were excellent for total problems [Cronbach's alpha (α) = 0.95] and between good and excellent for most CBCL sub-scales (α = 0.65-0.86). Behavioural/emotional scores were associated with pregnancy complications [adjusted beta coefficient (β) = 0.44 (95 % CI, 0.07-0.81)] and adverse perinatal events [β = 0.61 (95 % CI, 0.09-1.13)] suggesting discriminant validity of the CBCL. Most fit indices for the seven-syndrome CBCL structure were within acceptable range, being <0.09 for root mean squared error of approximation and >0.90 for Tucker-Lewis Index and Comparative Fit Index. The CBCL has good psychometric properties and the seven-syndrome structure fits well with the Kenyan preschool children suggesting it can be used to assess behavioural/emotional problems in this rural area.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 27%
Unspecified 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 45%
Unspecified 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,023,545
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#198
of 389 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,168
of 341,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#4
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 389 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,714 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.