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Apneic preoxygenation without nasal prongs: the “Hungarian Air Ambulance method”

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 969)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
41 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Apneic preoxygenation without nasal prongs: the “Hungarian Air Ambulance method”
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0200-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Attila Eross, Laszlo Hetzman, Andras Petroczy, Laszlo Gorove

Abstract

The Hungarian Air Ambulance has recently adopted oxygen supplementation during laryngoscopy, also known as apneic preoxygenation, to prevent desaturation during rapid sequence intubation. Despite its simplicity the nasal cannula method has some limitations relevant to our practice. First, the cannula can dislodge if the head is manipulated during preparation or intubation, especially if nasopharyngeal airways are chosen to maximise preoxygenation. Second, the method is incompatible with continuous nasal suctioning required in severe maxillofacial trauma. Third, if only one oxygen source and one competent assistant is available, a situation common during prehospital missions, the extra tube swap needed for continuous oxygen supplementation makes the procedure more complex and prone to error. We report a new method that provides comparable oxygen supplementation to the nasal cannula method, but at the same time eliminates the problems mentioned above and is easier and quicker to perform. It requires the intubator to cut and insert the tubing of the non-rebreather mask into the nasopharyngeal airway, thus providing direct pharyngeal insufflation. The method is applicable to every patient who has at least one nasopharyngeal airway inserted at the time of laryngoscopy and it only requires a pair of scissors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 52%
Engineering 2 9%
Psychology 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2017.
All research outputs
#600,009
of 15,807,214 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#44
of 969 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,162
of 343,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,807,214 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 969 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,132 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them