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Evaluation of potential mechanisms of atrazine-induced reproductive impairment in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, May 2016
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2 tweeters

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Title
Evaluation of potential mechanisms of atrazine-induced reproductive impairment in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, May 2016
DOI 10.1002/etc.3376
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine A. Richter, Diana M. Papoulias, Jeffrey J. Whyte, Donald E. Tillitt

Abstract

Atrazine has been implicated in reproductive dysfunction of exposed organisms, and previous studies documented decreased egg production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during 30 to 38 dexposures to 0.5, 5, and 50 µg/L atrazine. Here we sought to evaluate possible mechanisms underlying the reduction in egg production. Gene expression in steroidogenesis pathways and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis of male and female fish was measured. Atrazine did not significantly induce gonad aromatase (cyp19a1a) expression. An atrazine-induced shift in the number of females in an active reproductive state was observed. Expression of the egg maturation genes vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and zona pellucida glycoprotein 3.1 (zp3.1) in medaka females were correlated and had bimodal distributions. In both species, females with low vtg1 or zp3.1 expression also had low expression of steroidogenesis genes in the gonad, estrogen receptor in the liver, and gonadotropins in the brain. In the medaka, the number of females per tank that had high expression of zp3.1 was significantly correlated with egg production per tank. The number of medaka females with low expression of zp3.1 increased significantly with atrazine exposure. Thus, the decline in egg production observed in response to atrazine exposure may be the result of a coordinated down-regulation of genes required for reproduction in a subset of females. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Librarian 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Environmental Science 2 13%
Unspecified 1 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2016.
All research outputs
#13,042,440
of 17,015,490 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#3,655
of 4,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,430
of 346,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#56
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,015,490 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,767 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.