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Characterization of a cold-active esterase from Serratia sp. and improvement of thermostability by directed evolution

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biotechnology, January 2016
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Title
Characterization of a cold-active esterase from Serratia sp. and improvement of thermostability by directed evolution
Published in
BMC Biotechnology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12896-016-0235-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huang Jiang, Shaowei Zhang, Haofeng Gao, Nan Hu

Abstract

In recent years, cold-active esterases have received increased attention due to their attractive properties for some industrial applications such as high catalytic activity at low temperatures. An esterase-encoding gene (estS, 909 bp) from Serratia sp. was identified, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli DE3 (BL21). The estS encoded a protein (EstS) of 302 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 32.5 kDa. It showed the highest activity at 10 °C and pH 8.5. EstS was cold active and retained ~92 % of its original activity at 0 °C. Thermal inactivation analysis showed that the T1/2 value of EstS was 50 min at 50 °C (residual activity 41.23 %) after 1 h incubation. EstS is also quite stable in high salt conditions and displayed better catalytic activity in the presence of 4 M NaCl. To improve the thermo-stability of EstS, variants of estS gene were created by error-prone PCR. A mutant 1-D5 (A43V, R116W, D147N) that showed higher thermo-stability than its wild type predecessor was selected. 1-D5 showed enhanced T1/2 of 70 min at 50 °C and retained 63.29 % of activity after incubation at 50 °C for 60 min, which were about 22 % higher than the wild type (WT). CD spectrum showed that the secondary structure of WT and 1-D5 are more or less similar, but an increase in β-sheets was recorded, which enhanced the thermostability of mutant protein. EstS was a novel cold-active and salt-tolerant esterase and half-life of mutant 1-D5 was enhanced by 1.4 times compared with WT. The features of EstS are interesting and can be exploited for commercial applications. The results have also provided useful information about the structure and function of Est protein.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Researcher 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 24%
Engineering 3 14%
Unknown 6 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,244,176
of 7,012,411 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biotechnology
#345
of 451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,215
of 317,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biotechnology
#14
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,012,411 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 451 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,436 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.