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Low autophagy capacity implicated in motor system vulnerability to mutant superoxide dismutase

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Low autophagy capacity implicated in motor system vulnerability to mutant superoxide dismutase
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40478-016-0274-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eiichi Tokuda, Thomas Brännström, Peter M. Andersen, Stefan L. Marklund

Abstract

The motor system is selectively vulnerable to mutations in the ubiquitously expressed aggregation-prone enzyme superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1). Autophagy clears aggregates, and factors involved in the process were analyzed in multiple areas of the CNS from human control subjects (n = 10) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients (n = 18) with or without SOD1 mutations. In control subjects, the key regulatory protein Beclin 1 and downstream factors were remarkably scarce in spinal motor areas. In ALS patients, there was evidence of moderate autophagy activation and also dysregulation. These changes were largest in SOD1 mutation carriers. To explore consequences of low autophagy capacity, effects of a heterozygous deletion of Beclin 1 were examined in ALS mouse models expressing mutant SOD1s. This caused earlier SOD1 aggregation, onset of symptoms, motor neuron loss, and a markedly shortened survival. In contrast, the levels of soluble misfolded SOD1 species were reduced. The findings suggest that an inherent low autophagy capacity might cause the vulnerability of the motor system, and that SOD1 aggregation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 31%
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 23%
Neuroscience 9 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2016.
All research outputs
#713,925
of 7,099,316 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#90
of 339 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,808
of 319,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#13
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,099,316 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 339 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,272 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.