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Multiple rod–cone and cone–rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple rod–cone and cone–rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2016
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2015.2624
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruno F. Simões, Filipa L. Sampaio, Ellis R. Loew, Kate L. Sanders, Robert N. Fisher, Nathan S. Hart, David M. Hunt, Julian C. Partridge, David J. Gower

Abstract

In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor 'transmutation'. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Lecturer 3 8%
Professor 2 5%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 24%
Unspecified 5 14%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2017.
All research outputs
#782,086
of 12,367,173 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,306
of 7,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,059
of 336,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#63
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,330 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.