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The independent prospective associations of activity intensity and dietary energy density with adiposity in young adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Nutrition, January 2016
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Title
The independent prospective associations of activity intensity and dietary energy density with adiposity in young adolescents
Published in
British Journal of Nutrition, January 2016
DOI 10.1017/s0007114515005097
Pubmed ID
Authors

Esther M. F. van Sluijs, Stephen J. Sharp, Gina L. Ambrosini, Aedin Cassidy, Simon J. Griffin, Ulf Ekelund

Abstract

There is limited evidence on the prospective association of time spent in activity intensity (sedentary (SED), moderate (MPA) or vigorous (VPA) physical activity) and dietary intake with adiposity indicators in young people. This study aimed to assess associations between (1) baseline objectively measured activity intensity, dietary energy density (DED) and 4-year change in adiposity and (2) 4-year change in activity intensity/DED and adiposity at follow-up. We conducted cohort analyses including 367 participants (10 years at baseline, 14 years at follow-up) with valid data for objectively measured activity (Actigraph), DED (4-d food diary), anthropometry (waist circumference (WC), %body fat (%BF), fat mass index (FMI), weight status) and covariates. Linear and logistic regression models were fit, including adjustment for DED and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Results showed that baseline DED was associated with change in WC (β for 1kJ/g difference: 0·71; 95% CI 0·26, 1·17), particularly in boys (1·26; 95% CI 0·41, 2·16 v. girls: 0·26; 95% CI -0·34, 0·87), but not with %BF, FMI or weight status. In contrast, baseline SED, MPA or VPA were not associated with any of the outcomes. Change in DED was negatively associated with FMI (β for 1kJ/g increase: -0·86; 95% CI -1·59, -0·12) and %BF (-0·86; 95% CI -1·25, -0·11) but not WC (-0·27; 95% CI -1·02, 0·48). Change in SED, MPA and VPA did not predict adiposity at follow-up. In conclusion, activity intensity was not prospectively associated with adiposity, whereas the directions of associations with DED were inconsistent. To inform public health efforts, future studies should continue to analyse longitudinal data to further understand the independent role of different energy-balance behaviours in changes in adiposity in early adolescence.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 22%
Student > Master 10 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 24%
Sports and Recreations 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Other 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#9,936,152
of 12,412,180 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Nutrition
#3,797
of 4,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,097
of 334,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Nutrition
#112
of 137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,412,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,488 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.