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Genomes and virulence difference between two physiological races of Phytophthora nicotianae

Overview of attention for article published in Giga Science, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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Title
Genomes and virulence difference between two physiological races of Phytophthora nicotianae
Published in
Giga Science, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13742-016-0108-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hui Liu, Xiao Ma, Haiqin Yu, Dunhuang Fang, Yongping Li, Xiao Wang, Wen Wang, Yang Dong, Bingguang Xiao

Abstract

Black shank is a severe plant disease caused by the soil-borne pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two physiological races of P. nicotianae, races 0 and 1, are predominantly observed in cultivated tobacco fields around the world. Race 0 has been reported to be more aggressive, having a shorter incubation period, and causing worse root rot symptoms, while race 1 causes more severe necrosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying the difference in virulence between race 0 and 1 remain elusive. We assembled and annotated the genomes of P. nicotianae races 0 and 1, which were obtained by a combination of PacBio single-molecular real-time sequencing and second-generation sequencing (both HiSeq and MiSeq platforms). Gene family analysis revealed a highly expanded ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in P. nicotianae. Specifically, more RxLR effector genes were found in the genome of race 0 than in that of race 1. In addition, RxLR effector genes were found to be mainly distributed in gene-sparse, repeat-rich regions of the P. nicotianae genome. These results provide not only high quality reference genomes of P. nicotianae, but also insights into the infection mechanisms of P. nicotianae and its co-evolution with the host plant. They also reveal insights into the difference in virulence between the two physiological races.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 3%
Slovenia 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Lecturer 3 9%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 30%
Computer Science 1 3%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2016.
All research outputs
#953,156
of 11,870,332 outputs
Outputs from Giga Science
#221
of 457 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,464
of 345,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Giga Science
#9
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,870,332 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 457 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,685 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.