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Identification of molecular signatures specific for distinct cranial sensory ganglia in the developing chick

Overview of attention for article published in Neural Development, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 150)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Identification of molecular signatures specific for distinct cranial sensory ganglia in the developing chick
Published in
Neural Development, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13064-016-0057-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cedric Patthey, Harry Clifford, Wilfried Haerty, Chris P. Ponting, Sebastian M. Shimeld, Jo Begbie

Abstract

The cranial sensory ganglia represent populations of neurons with distinct functions, or sensory modalities. The production of individual ganglia from distinct neurogenic placodes with different developmental pathways provides a powerful model to investigate the acquisition of specific sensory modalities. To date there is a limited range of gene markers available to examine the molecular pathways underlying this process. Transcriptional profiles were generated for populations of differentiated neurons purified from distinct cranial sensory ganglia using microdissection in embryonic chicken followed by FAC-sorting and RNAseq. Whole transcriptome analysis confirmed the division into somato- versus viscerosensory neurons, with additional evidence for subdivision of the somatic class into general and special somatosensory neurons. Cross-comparison of distinct ganglia transcriptomes identified a total of 134 markers, 113 of which are novel, which can be used to distinguish trigeminal, vestibulo-acoustic and epibranchial neuronal populations. In situ hybridisation analysis provided validation for 20/26 tested markers, and showed related expression in the target region of the hindbrain in many cases. One hundred thirty-four high-confidence markers have been identified for placode-derived cranial sensory ganglia which can now be used to address the acquisition of specific cranial sensory modalities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Norway 1 3%
Unknown 35 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 22%
Neuroscience 6 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,071,728
of 8,604,762 outputs
Outputs from Neural Development
#26
of 150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,586
of 337,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neural Development
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,604,762 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 150 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,517 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them