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A dynamic leaf gas‐exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO 2 : evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO 2 enrichment studies

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, January 2016
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2 tweeters

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163 Mendeley
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Title
A dynamic leaf gas‐exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO 2 : evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO 2 enrichment studies
Published in
Global Change Biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13102
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven L. Voelker, J. Renée Brooks, Frederick C. Meinzer, Rebecca Anderson, Martin K.‐F. Bader, Giovanna Battipaglia, Katie M. Becklin, David Beerling, Didier Bert, Julio L. Betancourt, Todd E. Dawson, Jean‐Christophe Domec, Richard P. Guyette, Christian Körner, Steven W. Leavitt, Sune Linder, John D. Marshall, Manuel Mildner, Jérôme Ogée, Irina Panyushkina, Heather J. Plumpton, Kurt S. Pregitzer, Matthias Saurer, Andrew R. Smith, Rolf T. W. Siegwolf, Michael C. Stambaugh, Alan F. Talhelm, Jacques C. Tardif, Peter K. Van de Water, Joy K. Ward, Lisa Wingate

Abstract

Rising atmospheric [CO2 ], ca , is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have proposed various strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange that include maintaining a constant leaf internal [CO2 ], ci , a constant drawdown in CO2 (ca - ci ), and a constant ci /ca . These strategies can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange. The accuracy of Earth systems models depends in part on assumptions about generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to varying ca . The concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these strategies, provides a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca . To assess leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies, we analyzed patterns in ci inferred from studies reporting C stable isotope ratios (δ(13) C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆) in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms that grew across a range of ca spanning at least 100 ppm. Our results suggest that much of the ca -induced changes in ci /ca occurred across ca spanning 200 to 400 ppm. These patterns imply that ca - ci will eventually approach a constant level at high ca because assimilation rates will reach a maximum and stomatal conductance of each species should be constrained to some minimum level. These analyses are not consistent with canalization towards any single strategy, particularly maintaining a constant ci . Rather, the results are consistent with the existence of a broadly conserved pattern of stomatal optimization in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms. This results in trees being profligate water users at low ca , when additional water loss is small for each unit of C gain, and increasingly water-conservative at high ca , when photosystems are saturated and water loss is large for each unit C gain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 163 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 156 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 24%
Researcher 36 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 9%
Student > Master 13 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 5%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 26 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 33%
Environmental Science 41 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 21 13%
Engineering 2 1%
Chemistry 2 1%
Other 6 4%
Unknown 38 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2016.
All research outputs
#14,497,796
of 21,578,868 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#4,880
of 5,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,960
of 375,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#94
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,578,868 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,410 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.