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The contribution of Alu exons to the human proteome

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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42 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
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Title
The contribution of Alu exons to the human proteome
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13059-016-0876-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lan Lin, Peng Jiang, Juw Won Park, Jinkai Wang, Zhi-xiang Lu, Maggie P. Y. Lam, Peipei Ping, Yi Xing

Abstract

Alu elements are major contributors to lineage-specific new exons in primate and human genomes. Recent studies indicate that some Alu exons have high transcript inclusion levels or tissue-specific splicing profiles, and may play important regulatory roles in modulating mRNA degradation or translational efficiency. However, the contribution of Alu exons to the human proteome remains unclear and controversial. The prevailing view is that exons derived from young repetitive elements, such as Alu elements, are restricted to regulatory functions and have not had adequate evolutionary time to be incorporated into stable, functional proteins. We adopt a proteotranscriptomics approach to systematically assess the contribution of Alu exons to the human proteome. Using RNA sequencing, ribosome profiling, and proteomics data from human tissues and cell lines, we provide evidence for the translational activities of Alu exons and the presence of Alu exon derived peptides in human proteins. These Alu exon peptides represent species-specific protein differences between primates and other mammals, and in certain instances between humans and closely related primates. In the case of the RNA editing enzyme ADARB1, which contains an Alu exon peptide in its catalytic domain, RNA sequencing analyses of A-to-I editing demonstrate that both the Alu exon skipping and inclusion isoforms encode active enzymes. The Alu exon derived peptide may fine tune the overall editing activity and, in limited cases, the site selectivity of ADARB1 protein products. Our data indicate that Alu elements have contributed to the acquisition of novel protein sequences during primate and human evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Russia 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 91 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Master 7 7%
Other 6 6%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Computer Science 4 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 17 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#1,102,710
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1,068
of 3,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,805
of 348,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,593 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,882 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them