Gender ratio in a clinical population sample, age of diagnosis and duration of assessment in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Autism: The International Journal of Research & Practice, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
40 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
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Title
Gender ratio in a clinical population sample, age of diagnosis and duration of assessment in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder
Published in
Autism: The International Journal of Research & Practice, January 2016
DOI 10.1177/1362361315617879
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marion Rutherford, Karen McKenzie, Tess Johnson, Ciara Catchpole, Anne O’Hare, Iain McClure, Kirsty Forsyth, Deborah McCartney, Aja Murray, Rutherford, Marion, McKenzie, Karen, Johnson, Tess, Catchpole, Ciara, O'Hare, Anne, McClure, Iain, Forsyth, Kirsty, McCartney, Deborah, Murray, Aja, M. Rutherford, K. McKenzie, T. Johnson, C. Catchpole, A. OHare, I. McClure, K. Forsyth, D. McCartney, A. Murray

Abstract

This article reports on gender ratio, age of diagnosis and the duration of assessment procedures in autism spectrum disorder diagnosis in a national study which included all types of clinical services for children and adults. Findings are reported from a retrospective case note analysis undertaken with a representative sample of 150 Scottish children and adults recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The study reports key findings that the gender ratio in this consecutively referred cohort is lower than anticipated in some age groups and reduces with increasing age. The gender ratio in children, together with the significant difference in the mean age of referral and diagnosis for girls compared to boys, adds evidence of delayed recognition of autism spectrum disorder in younger girls. There was no significant difference in duration of assessment for males and females suggesting that delays in diagnosis of females occur prior to referral for assessment. Implications for practice and research are considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 20%
Librarian 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 33%
Social Sciences 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 27%
Mathematics 1 7%
Neuroscience 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2016.
All research outputs
#239,296
of 7,348,353 outputs
Outputs from Autism: The International Journal of Research & Practice
#78
of 746 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,550
of 322,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Autism: The International Journal of Research & Practice
#6
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,348,353 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 746 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.