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From tails to toes: developing nonlethal tissue indicators of mercury exposure in five amphibian species

Overview of attention for article published in Ecotoxicology, January 2016
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Title
From tails to toes: developing nonlethal tissue indicators of mercury exposure in five amphibian species
Published in
Ecotoxicology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1616-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam Z. Pfleeger, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Brandon M. Kowalski, Garth Herring, James J. Willacker, Allyson K. Jackson, John R. Pierce

Abstract

Exposure to environmental contaminants has been implicated as a factor in global amphibian decline. Mercury (Hg) is a particularly widespread contaminant that biomagnifies in amphibians and can cause a suite of deleterious effects. However, monitoring contaminant exposure in amphibian tissues may conflict with conservation goals if lethal take is required. Thus, there is a need to develop non-lethal tissue sampling techniques to quantify contaminant exposure in amphibians. Some minimally invasive sampling techniques, such as toe-clipping, are common in population-genetic research, but it is unclear if these methods can adequately characterize contaminant exposure. We examined the relationships between mercury (Hg) concentrations in non-lethally sampled tissues and paired whole-bodies in five amphibian species. Specifically, we examined the utility of three different tail-clip sections from four salamander species and toe-clips from one anuran species. Both tail and toe-clips accurately predicted whole-body THg concentrations, but the relationships differed among species and the specific tail-clip section or toe that was used. Tail-clips comprised of the distal 0-2 cm segment performed the best across all salamander species, explaining between 82 and 92 % of the variation in paired whole-body THg concentrations. Toe-clips were less effective predictors of frog THg concentrations, but THg concentrations in outer rear toes accounted for up to 79 % of the variability in frog whole-body THg concentrations. These findings suggest non-lethal sampling of tails and toes has potential applications for monitoring contaminant exposure and risk in amphibians, but care must be taken to ensure consistent collection and interpretation of samples.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Unspecified 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 40%
Environmental Science 8 32%
Unspecified 5 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#10,937,992
of 12,341,768 outputs
Outputs from Ecotoxicology
#616
of 948 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#282,614
of 343,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecotoxicology
#38
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,341,768 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 948 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.