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Avian malaria in a boreal resident species: long-term temporal variability, and increased prevalence in birds with avian keratin disorder

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Parasitology, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Avian malaria in a boreal resident species: long-term temporal variability, and increased prevalence in birds with avian keratin disorder
Published in
International Journal for Parasitology, April 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpara.2015.12.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura C. Wilkinson, Colleen M. Handel, Caroline Van Hemert, Claire Loiseau, Ravinder N.M. Sehgal

Abstract

The prevalence of vector-borne parasitic diseases is widely influenced by biological and ecological factors. Environmental conditions such as temperature and precipitation can have a marked effect on haemosporidian parasites (Plasmodium spp.) that cause malaria and those that cause other malaria-like diseases in birds. However, there have been few long-term studies monitoring haemosporidian infections in birds in northern latitudes, where weather conditions can be highly variable and the effects of climate change are becoming more pronounced. We used molecular methods to screen more than 2,000 blood samples collected from black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), a resident passerine bird. Samples were collected over a 10 year period, mostly during the non-breeding season, at seven sites in Alaska, USA. We tested for associations between Plasmodium prevalence and local environmental conditions including temperature, precipitation, site, year and season. We also evaluated the relationship between parasite prevalence and individual host factors of age, sex and presence or absence of avian keratin disorder. This disease, which causes accelerated keratin growth in the beak, provided a natural study system in which to test the interaction between disease state and malaria prevalence. Prevalence of Plasmodium infection varied by year, site, age and individual disease status but there was no support for an effect of sex or seasonal period. Significantly, birds with avian keratin disorder were 2.6 times more likely to be infected by Plasmodium than birds without the disorder. Interannual variation in the prevalence of Plasmodium infection at different sites was positively correlated with summer temperatures at the local but not statewide scale. Sequence analysis of the parasite cytochrome b gene revealed a single Plasmodium spp. lineage, P43. Our results demonstrate associations between prevalence of avian malaria and a variety of biological and ecological factors. These results also provide important baseline data that will be informative for predicting future changes in Plasmodium prevalence in the subarctic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Lithuania 1 1%
Unknown 95 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 18%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 12 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 45%
Environmental Science 9 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 18 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2016.
All research outputs
#2,975,846
of 13,326,918 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Parasitology
#321
of 1,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,285
of 336,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Parasitology
#5
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,326,918 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,536 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,578 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.