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Candidate Antimetastasis Drugs Suppress the Metastatic Capacity of Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Membrane Fluidity

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, March 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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75 Dimensions

Readers on

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103 Mendeley
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Title
Candidate Antimetastasis Drugs Suppress the Metastatic Capacity of Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Membrane Fluidity
Published in
Cancer Research, March 2016
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-15-1970
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weina Zhao, Sara Prijic, Bettina C. Urban, Michael J. Tisza, Yan Zuo, Lin Li, Zhi Tan, Xiaoling Chen, Sendurai A. Mani, Jeffrey T. Chang

Abstract

Despite the high mortality from metastatic cancer, therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis are limited. Efforts to identify genetic aberrations that predispose tumors to metastasis have been mostly unsuccessful. To understand the nature of candidate targets for metastatic disease, we performed an in silico screen to identify drugs that can inhibit a gene expression signature associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Compounds discovered through this method, including those previously identified, appeared to restrict metastatic capacity through a common mechanism, the ability to modulate the fluidity of cell membranes. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines with the putative anti-metastasis agents reduced membrane fluidity, resulting in decreased cell motility, stem cell-like properties, and EMT in vitro, and the drugs also inhibited spontaneous metastasis in vivo. When fluidity was unchanged, the anti-metastasis compounds could no longer restrict metastasis, indicating a causal association between fluidity and metastasis. We further demonstrate that fluidity can be regulated by cellular cholesterol flux, as the cholesterol efflux channel, ABCA1, potentiated metastatic behaviors in vitro and in vivo. The requirement for fluidity was further supported by the finding in breast cancer patients that ABCA1 was overexpressed in 41% of metastatic tumors, reducing time to metastasis by nine years. Collectively, our findings reveal increased membrane fluidity as a necessary cellular feature of metastatic potential that can be controlled by many currently available drugs, offering a viable therapeutic opportunity to prevent cancer metastasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 103 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Master 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Other 24 23%
Unknown 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 16%
Chemistry 8 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 26 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2022.
All research outputs
#6,921,826
of 21,349,333 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#7,073
of 16,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,506
of 374,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#89
of 237 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,349,333 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,932 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 237 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.