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The puzzling Venusian polar atmospheric structure reproduced by a general circulation model

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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7 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
Title
The puzzling Venusian polar atmospheric structure reproduced by a general circulation model
Published in
Nature Communications, February 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms10398
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiroki Ando, Norihiko Sugimoto, Masahiro Takagi, Hiroki Kashimura, Takeshi Imamura, Yoshihisa Matsuda

Abstract

Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the midlatitudes at cloud-top levels (∼65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ∼60° latitude, which is a unique feature called 'cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. Here we perform numerical simulations of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model, and succeed in reproducing these puzzling features in close agreement with the observations. The cold collar and warm polar region are attributed to the residual mean meridional circulation enhanced by the thermal tide. The present results strongly suggest that the thermal tide is crucial for the structure of the Venus upper polar atmosphere at and above cloud levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Slovenia 1 13%
Unknown 7 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 38%
Researcher 2 25%
Other 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Librarian 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%
Psychology 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,013,108
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#13,060
of 19,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,857
of 345,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#238
of 372 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 19,536 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,067 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 372 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.