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Combining regenerative medicine strategies to provide durable reconstructive options: auricular cartilage tissue engineering

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, January 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Combining regenerative medicine strategies to provide durable reconstructive options: auricular cartilage tissue engineering
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0273-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zita M. Jessop, Muhammad Javed, Iris A. Otto, Emman J. Combellack, Siân Morgan, Corstiaan C. Breugem, Charles W. Archer, Ilyas M. Khan, William C. Lineaweaver, Moshe Kon, Jos Malda, Iain S. Whitaker

Abstract

Recent advances in regenerative medicine place us in a unique position to improve the quality of engineered tissue. We use auricular cartilage as an exemplar to illustrate how the use of tissue-specific adult stem cells, assembly through additive manufacturing and improved understanding of postnatal tissue maturation will allow us to more accurately replicate native tissue anisotropy. This review highlights the limitations of autologous auricular reconstruction, including donor site morbidity, technical considerations and long-term complications. Current tissue-engineered auricular constructs implanted into immune-competent animal models have been observed to undergo inflammation, fibrosis, foreign body reaction, calcification and degradation. Combining biomimetic regenerative medicine strategies will allow us to improve tissue-engineered auricular cartilage with respect to biochemical composition and functionality, as well as microstructural organization and overall shape. Creating functional and durable tissue has the potential to shift the paradigm in reconstructive surgery by obviating the need for donor sites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 22%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 16 21%
Unknown 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 35%
Engineering 11 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,554,362
of 7,349,306 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#296
of 558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,758
of 322,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#24
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,349,306 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 558 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.