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Lessons from a French collaborative case–control study in cystic fibrosis patients during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2016
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24 Mendeley
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Title
Lessons from a French collaborative case–control study in cystic fibrosis patients during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemy
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1352-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie Bucher, Pierre-Yves Boelle, Dominique Hubert, Muriel Lebourgeois, Nathalie Stremler, Isabelle Durieu, François Bremont, Eric Deneuville, Bertrand Delaisi, Harriet Corvol, Laurence Bassinet, Dominique Grenet, Natacha Remus, Marie Véronique Vodoff, Véronique Boussaud, Françoise Troussier, Marianne Leruez-Ville, Jean-Marc Treluyer, Odile Launay, Isabelle Sermet-Gaudelus

Abstract

Viral infections such as influenza are thought to impact respiratory parameters and to promote infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the real morbidity of the influenza virus in CF needs to be further investigated because previous studies were only observational. CF patients were included in a case-control study (n = 44 cases and n = 371 controls) during the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 influenza. Cases were patients with polymerase reaction chain-confirmed influenza A/H1N1 infection. Controls did not report any influenza symptoms during the same period. Sputum colonization and lung function were monitored during 1 year after inclusion. Cases were significantly younger than controls (mean(SD) 14.9 years(11) versus 20.1 years (13.2) and significantly less frequently colonized with P. aeruginosa (34 % versus 53 %). During influenza infection, 74 % of cases had pulmonary exacerbation, 92 % had antibiotics adapted to their usual sputum colonization and 82 % were treated with oseltamivir. Two cases required lung transplantation after A/H1N1 infection (one had not received oseltamivir and the other one had been treated late). The cases received a mean number of antibiotic treatments significantly higher during the year after the influenza infection (mean(SD) 2.8 (2.4) for cases versus 1.8(2.1) for controls; p = 0.002). An age-matched comparison did not demonstrate any significant modification of bronchopulmonary bacterial colonization during the year after influenza infection nor any significant change in FEV1 at months 1, 3 and 12 after A/H1N1 infection. Our results do not demonstrate any change in sputum colonization nor significant lung disease progression after pandemic A/H1N1 influenza. Clinical Trials.gov registration number: NCT01499914.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 21%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Professor 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 50%
Unspecified 4 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,537,796
of 7,089,314 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,800
of 3,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,279
of 319,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#54
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,089,314 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,256 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.