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Plastic pikas: Behavioural flexibility in low-elevation pikas (Ochotona princeps)

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioural Processes, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Plastic pikas: Behavioural flexibility in low-elevation pikas (Ochotona princeps)
Published in
Behavioural Processes, April 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.beproc.2016.01.009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Johanna Varner, Joshua J. Horns, Mallory S. Lambert, Elizabeth Westberg, James S. Ruff, Katelyn Wolfenberger, Erik A. Beever, M. Denise Dearing

Abstract

Behaviour is an important mechanism for accommodating rapid environmental changes. Understanding a species' capacity for behavioural plasticity is therefore a key, but understudied, aspect of developing tractable conservation and management plans under climate-change scenarios. Here, we quantified behavioural differences between American pikas (Ochotona princeps) living in an atypical, low-elevation habitat versus those living in a more typical, alpine habitat. With respect to foraging strategy, low-elevation pikas spent more time consuming vegetation and less time caching food for winter, compared to high-elevation pikas. Low-elevation pikas were also far more likely to be detected in forested microhabitats off the talus than their high-elevation counterparts at midday. Finally, pikas living in the atypical habitat had smaller home range sizes compared to those in typical habitat or any previously published home ranges for this species. Our findings indicate that behavioural plasticity likely allows pikas to accommodate atypical conditions in low-elevation habitat, and that they may rely on critical habitat factors such as suitable microclimate refugia to behaviourally thermoregulate. Together, these results suggest that behavioural adjustments are one important mechanism by which pikas can persist outside of their previously appreciated dietary and thermal niches.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 68 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 24%
Researcher 16 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 49%
Environmental Science 14 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Psychology 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2016.
All research outputs
#1,988,178
of 12,238,244 outputs
Outputs from Behavioural Processes
#237
of 1,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,182
of 343,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioural Processes
#10
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,238,244 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,271 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.