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Anthropogenic noise increases fish mortality by predation

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
36 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
52 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
408 Mendeley
Title
Anthropogenic noise increases fish mortality by predation
Published in
Nature Communications, February 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms10544
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen D. Simpson, Andrew N. Radford, Sophie L. Nedelec, Maud C. O. Ferrari, Douglas P. Chivers, Mark I. McCormick, Mark G. Meekan

Abstract

Noise-generating human activities affect hearing, communication and movement in terrestrial and aquatic animals, but direct evidence for impacts on survival is rare. We examined effects of motorboat noise on post-settlement survival and physiology of a prey fish species and its performance when exposed to predators. Both playback of motorboat noise and direct disturbance by motorboats elevated metabolic rate in Ambon damselfish (Pomacentrus amboinensis), which when stressed by motorboat noise responded less often and less rapidly to simulated predatory strikes. Prey were captured more readily by their natural predator (dusky dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus) during exposure to motorboat noise compared with ambient conditions, and more than twice as many prey were consumed by the predator in field experiments when motorboats were passing. Our study suggests that a common source of noise in the marine environment has the potential to impact fish demography, highlighting the need to include anthropogenic noise in management plans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 408 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 396 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 93 23%
Student > Master 79 19%
Researcher 70 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 14%
Student > Postgraduate 19 5%
Other 36 9%
Unknown 53 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 206 50%
Environmental Science 98 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 1%
Psychology 5 1%
Other 15 4%
Unknown 68 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 338. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2020.
All research outputs
#43,941
of 15,583,856 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#589
of 29,631 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,255
of 344,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#2
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,583,856 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,631 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,442 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.