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Effectiveness of pure argon for renal transplant preservation in a preclinical pig model of heterotopic autotransplantation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, February 2016
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Title
Effectiveness of pure argon for renal transplant preservation in a preclinical pig model of heterotopic autotransplantation
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0795-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Faure, Laurie Bruzzese, Jean-Guillaume Steinberg, Yves Jammes, Julia Torrents, Stephane V. Berdah, Emmanuelle Garnier, Tristan Legris, Anderson Loundou, Matthieu Chalopin, Guy Magalon, Regis Guieu, Emmanuel Fenouillet, Eric Lechevallier

Abstract

In kidney transplantation, the conditions of organ preservation following removal influence function recovery. Current static preservation procedures are generally based on immersion in a cold-storage solution used under atmospheric air (approximately 78 kPa N2, 21 kPa O2, 1 kPa Ar). Research on static cold-preservation solutions has stalled, and modifying the gas composition of the storage medium for improving preservation was considered. Organoprotective strategies successfully used noble gases and we addressed here the effects of argon and xenon on graft preservation in an established preclinical pig model of autotransplantation. The preservation solution Celsior saturated with pure argon (Argon-Celsior) or xenon (Xenon-Celsior) at atmospheric pressure was tested versus Celsior saturated with atmospheric air (Air-Celsior). The left kidney was removed, and Air-Celsior (n = 8 pigs), Argon-Celsior (n = 8) or Xenon-Celsior (n = 6) was used at 4 °C to flush and store the transplant for 30 h, a duration that induced ischemic injury in our model when Air-Celsior was used. Heterotopic autotransplantation and contralateral nephrectomy were performed. Animals were followed for 21 days. The use of Argon-Celsior vs. Air-Celsior: (1) improved function recovery as monitored via creatinine clearance, the fraction of excreted sodium and tubulopathy duration; (2) enabled diuresis recovery 2-3 days earlier; (3) improved survival (7/8 vs. 3/8 pigs survived at postoperative day-21); (4) decreased tubular necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, apoptosis and inflammation, and preserved tissue structures as observed after the natural death/euthanasia; (5) stimulated plasma antioxidant defences during the days following transplantation as shown by monitoring the "reduced ascorbic acid/thiobarbituric acid reactive substances" ratio and Hsp27 expression; (6) limited the inflammatory response as shown by expression of TNF-alpha, IL1-beta and IL6 as observed after the natural death/euthanasia. Conversely, Xenon-Celsior was detrimental, no animal surviving by day-8 in a context where functional recovery, renal tissue properties and the antioxidant and inflammation responses were significantly altered. Thus, the positive effects of argon were not attributable to the noble gases as a group. The saturation of Celsior with argon improved early functional recovery, graft quality and survival. Manipulating the gas composition of a preservation medium constitutes therefore a promising approach to improve preservation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Librarian 2 9%
Professor 2 9%
Other 5 23%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 45%
Arts and Humanities 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Computer Science 1 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2016.
All research outputs
#9,688,893
of 15,220,640 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,641
of 2,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,107
of 342,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,220,640 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,054 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them