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Amphetamine manipulates monoamine oxidase-A level and behavior using theranostic aptamers of transcription factors AP-1/NF-kB.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
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Title
Amphetamine manipulates monoamine oxidase-A level and behavior using theranostic aptamers of transcription factors AP-1/NF-kB.
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12929-016-0239-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liu, Christina H, Ren, Jiaqian, Liu, Philip K

Abstract

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes play a critical role in controlling the catabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters and biogenic trace amines and behavior in humans. However, the mechanisms that regulate MAO are unclear. Several transcription factor proteins are proposed to modulate the transcription of MAO gene, but evidence supporting these hypotheses is controversial. We aimed to investigate the mechanism of gene transcription regulator proteins on amphetamine-induced behavior. We applied aptamers containing a DNA binding sequence, as well as a random sequence (without target) to study the modulation of amphetamine-induced MAO levels and hyperactivity in living mice. We pretreated in adult male C57black6 mice (Taconic Farm, Germantown, NY) (n ≥ 3 litters at a time), 2 to 3 months of age (23 ± 2 gm body weight) with double-stranded (ds) DNA aptamers with sequence specific to activator protein-1 (5ECdsAP1), nuclear factor-kappa beta (5ECdsNF-kB), special protein-1 (5ECdsSP-1) or cyclicAMP responsive element binding (5ECdsCreB) protein binding regions, 5ECdsRan [a random sequence without target], single-stranded AP-1 (5ECssAP-1) (8 nmol DNA per kg) or saline (5 μl, intracerebroventricular [icv] injection) control before amphetamine administration (4 mg/kg, i.p.). We then measured and analyzed locomotor activities and the level of MAO-A and MAO-B activity. In the pathological condition of amphetamine exposure, we showed here that pretreatment with 5ECdsAP1 and 5ECdsNF-kB reversed the decrease of MAO-A activity (p < 0.05, t test), but not activity of the B isomer (MAO-B), in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) of C57black6 mice. The change in MAO-A level coincided with a reversed amphetamine-induced restless behavior of mice. Pretreatments with saline, 5ECdsCreB, 5ECdsSP-1, 5ECdsRan or 5ECssAP-1 had no effect. Our data lead us to conclude that elevation of AP-1 or NF-kB indirectly decreases MAO-A protein levels which, in turn, diminishes MAO-A ability in the VTA of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway that has been implicated in cells under stress especially in the SN and VTA. This study has implications for design for the treatment of drug exposure and perhaps Parkinson's dementia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 25%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Other 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Psychology 3 11%
Neuroscience 3 11%
Chemistry 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,549,620
of 7,103,144 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#173
of 328 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,325
of 319,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#7
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,103,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 328 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,350 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.