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Population structure and associated phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovars Derby and Mbandaka overlap with host range

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, February 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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3 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Population structure and associated phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovars Derby and Mbandaka overlap with host range
Published in
BMC Microbiology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0628-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew R. Hayward, Liljana Petrovska, Vincent A. A. Jansen, Martin J. Woodward

Abstract

The Salmonella enterica serovar Derby is frequently isolated from pigs and turkeys whereas serovar Mbandaka is frequently isolated from cattle, chickens and animal feed in the UK. Through comparative genomics, phenomics and mutant construction we previously suggested possible mechanistic reasons why these serovars demonstrate apparently distinct host ranges. Here, we investigate the genetic and phenotypic diversity of these two serovars in the UK. We produce a phylogenetic reconstruction and perform several biochemical assays on isolates of S. Derby and S. Mbandaka acquired from sites across the UK between the years 2000 and 2010. We show that UK isolates of S. Mbandaka comprise of one clonal lineage which is adapted to proficient utilisation of metabolites found in soya beans under ambient conditions. We also show that this clonal lineage forms a biofilm at 25 °C, suggesting that this serovar maybe well adapted to survival ex vivo, growing in animal feed. Conversely, we show that S. Derby is made of two distinct lineages, L1 and L2. These lineages differ genotypically and phenotypically, being divided by the presence and absence of SPI-23 and the ability to more proficiently invade porcine jejunum derived cell line IPEC-J2. The results of this study lend support to the hypothesis that the differences in host ranges of S. Derby and S. Mbandaka are adaptations to pathogenesis, environmental persistence, as well as utilisation of metabolites abundant in their respective host environments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Librarian 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,638,618
of 7,818,357 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#228
of 1,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,040
of 328,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#16
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,818,357 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,319 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,135 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.