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The phenotypic impact of the male-specific region of chromosome-Y in inbred mating: the role of genetic variants and gene duplications in multiple inbred rat strains

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, February 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

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Title
The phenotypic impact of the male-specific region of chromosome-Y in inbred mating: the role of genetic variants and gene duplications in multiple inbred rat strains
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0064-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeremy W. Prokop, Shirng-Wern Tsaih, Allison B. Faber, Shannon Boehme, Adam C. Underwood, Samuel Troyer, Lauren Playl, Amy Milsted, Monte E. Turner, Daniel Ely, Almir S. Martins, Marek Tutaj, Jozef Lazar, Melinda R. Dwinell, Howard J. Jacob

Abstract

The male-specific region of chromosome-Y (MSY) contributes to phenotypes outside of testis development and has a high rate of evolution between mammalian species. With a lack of genomic crossover, MSY is one of the few genomic areas under similar variation and evolutionary selection in inbred and outbred animal populations, allowing for an assessment of evolutionary mechanisms to translate between the populations. Using next-generation sequencing, MSY consomic strains, molecular characterization, and large-scale phenotyping, we present here regions of MSY that contribute to inbred strain phenotypes. We have shown that (1) MSY of rat has nine autosomal gene transposition events with strain-specific selection; (2) sequence variants in MSY occur with a 1.98-fold higher number of variants than other chromosomes in seven sequenced rat strains; (3) Sry, the most studied MSY gene, has undergone extensive gene duplications, driving ubiquitous expression not seen in human or mouse; (4) the expression profile of Sry in the rat is driven by the insertion of the Sry2 copy into an intron of the ubiquitously expressed Kdm5d gene in antisense orientation, but due to several loss of function mutations in the Sry2 protein, nuclear localization and transcriptional control are decreased; (5) expression of Sry copies other than Sry2 in the rat overlaps with the expression profile for human SRY; (6) gene duplications and sequence variants (P76T) of Sry can be selected for phenotypes such as high blood pressure and androgen receptor signaling within inbred mating; and most importantly, (7) per chromosome size, MSY contributes to higher strain-specific phenotypic variation relative to all other chromosomes, with 53 phenotypes showing both a male to female and consomic cross significance. The data presented supports a high probability of MSY genetic variation altering a broad range of inbred rat phenotypes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 31%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 15%
Unknown 4 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,180,401
of 7,168,681 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#73
of 122 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,573
of 319,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#10
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,168,681 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 122 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.