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Emu oil offers protection in Crohn’s disease model in rats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Emu oil offers protection in Crohn’s disease model in rats
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12906-016-1035-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bhaskar Vemu, S. Selvasubramanian, V. Pandiyan

Abstract

Emu oil is a product of animal origin used for the treatment of inflammation, burns etc. as a part of aboriginal medicine in Australia. Crohn's disease is a common inflammatory manifestation in humans and other animal species relating to the ulceration and digestive disturbances in upper gastro-intestinal tract. Aloe vera is commonly used substance from plant sources for inflammation, wound healing and various other properties. Given the difference in the source of the substances all the while playing a similar therapeutic role in different parts of the world, the present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of aloe vera and emu oil alone and in combination; in comparison to sulfasalazine (Allopathic drug) as an alternative for the treatment of Crohn's disease. Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups with two sub-groups of six animals each. After pre-treating the animals with sulfasalazine, aloe vera, emu oil and their combination for five consecutive days, the animals were sub-cutaneously administered indomethacin on 4(th) and 5(th) day and each sub-group was sacrificed on day 6 and 9. After sacrifice, serum and intestine of these animals was collected. Intestine length from duodenum till caecum was measured for estimating relative organ weight and disease activity index. Part of intestine was preserved in formalin for histopathology while the rest was used for analysis of oxidative parameters and myeloperoxidase. Serum collected was used for measuring alkaline phosphatase and cholesterol. Assessment of the parameters in treatment groups indicated that the combination of aloe vera and emu oil resulted in better protection by suppressing the oxidative (P < 0.05) and histomorphological changes indicating a enhanced effect of these two agents which was found to be better than sulfasalazine. The combination of emu oil and aloe vera exhibited enhanced effect resulting in significant protection from indomethacin induced ulceration. This might be due to the different mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects (Salicylic acid in aloe vera and n3, n6 fatty acids acting as pseudosubstrates to cyclooxygenase enzyme) of components of the animal and plant products tested.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Professor 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2016.
All research outputs
#2,646,189
of 14,643,707 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#606
of 2,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,067
of 338,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,643,707 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,951 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them