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Evidence for plasmid-mediated salt tolerance in the human gut microbiome and potential mechanisms

Overview of attention for article published in FEMS Microbiology Ecology, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for plasmid-mediated salt tolerance in the human gut microbiome and potential mechanisms
Published in
FEMS Microbiology Ecology, February 2016
DOI 10.1093/femsec/fiw019
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eileen Broaders, Ciarán O’Brien, Cormac G.M. Gahan, Julian R. Marchesi

Abstract

The human gut microbiome is critical to health and wellbeing. It hosts a complex ecosystem comprising a multitude of bacterial species, which contributes functionality that would otherwise be absent from the host. Transient and commensal bacteria in the gut must withstand many stresses. The influence of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids in stress adaptation within the ecosystem is poorly understood. Using a mobilomic approach we found evidence for plasmid mediated osmotolerance as a phenotype amongst the Proteobacteria in healthy faecal slurries. A transconjugant carrying multiple plasmids acquired from healthy faecal slurry demonstrated increased osmotolerance in the presence of metal salts, particularly potassium chloride, which was not evident in the recipient. Pyrosequencing and analysis of the total plasmid DNA demonstrated the presence of plasmid-borne osmotolerance systems (including KdpD and H-NS) which may be linked to the observed phenotype. This is the first report of a transferable osmotolerance phenotype in gut commensals and may have implications for the transfer of osmotolerance in other niches.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 30%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Professor 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Chemistry 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,674,516
of 20,115,055 outputs
Outputs from FEMS Microbiology Ecology
#345
of 2,094 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,931
of 367,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age from FEMS Microbiology Ecology
#6
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,115,055 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,094 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 367,043 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.