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Parsing fear: A reassessment of the evidence for fear deficits in psychopathy.

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Bulletin, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
148 Mendeley
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Title
Parsing fear: A reassessment of the evidence for fear deficits in psychopathy.
Published in
Psychological Bulletin, January 2016
DOI 10.1037/bul0000040
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sylco S. Hoppenbrouwers, Berend H. Bulten, Inti A. Brazil

Abstract

Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by interpersonal manipulation and callousness, and reckless and impulsive antisocial behavior. It is often seen as a disorder in which profound emotional disturbances lead to antisocial behavior. A lack of fear in particular has been proposed as an etiologically salient factor. In this review, we employ a conceptual model in which fear is parsed into separate subcomponents. Important historical conceptualizations of psychopathy, the neuroscientific and empirical evidence for fear deficits in psychopathy are compared against this model. The empirical evidence is also subjected to a meta-analysis. We conclude that most studies have used the term "fear" generically, amassing different methods and levels of measurement under the umbrella term "fear." Unlike earlier claims that psychopathy is related to general fearlessness, we show there is evidence that psychopathic individuals have deficits in threat detection and responsivity, but that the evidence for reduced subjective experience of fear in psychopathy is far less compelling. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 148 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 144 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 16%
Student > Master 21 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Researcher 16 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 37 25%
Unknown 21 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 72 49%
Neuroscience 12 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 3%
Unspecified 4 3%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 34 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2019.
All research outputs
#395,819
of 15,300,711 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Bulletin
#188
of 1,984 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,755
of 344,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Bulletin
#8
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,300,711 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,984 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.