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Acute effects of ayahuasca in a juvenile non-human primate model of depression

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, August 2019
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
133 Mendeley
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Title
Acute effects of ayahuasca in a juvenile non-human primate model of depression
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, August 2019
DOI 10.1590/1516-4446-2018-0140
Pubmed ID
Authors

Flávia S. da Silva, Erick A.S. Silva, Geovan M. de Sousa Jr., João P. Maia-de-Oliveira, Vanessa de Paula Soares-Rachetti, Draulio B. de Araujo, Maria B.C. Sousa, Bruno Lobão-Soares, Jaime Hallak, Nicole L. Galvão-Coelho

Abstract

The incidence rate of major depression in adolescents reaches approximately 14%. This disorder is usually recurrent, without remission of symptoms even after pharmacological treatment, and persists throughout adult life. Since the effects of antidepressants take approximately 2 weeks to begin, new pharmacological therapies are under continuous exploration. Recent evidence suggests that psychedelics could produce rapid antidepressant effects. In this study, we evaluated the potential antidepressant effects of ayahuasca in a juvenile non-human primate model of depression. While living with their families, juvenile marmosets (8 males; 7 females) were observed on alternate days for four weeks during a baseline phase. This was followed by 8 weeks of an induced depressive state protocol, the social isolated context (IC), in which the animals were monitored in the first and last weeks. Subsequently, five males and four females were randomly selected for treatment, first with a single administration of saline vehicle (1.67 mL/300 g of body weight, via gavage), followed by a single dose of ayahuasca (1.67 mL/300 g of body weight, via gavage). Both phases lasted 1 week and the animals were monitored daily. A third week of sampling was called the tardive-pharmacological effects phase. In all phases the marmosets were assessed for behavior, fecal cortisol levels, and body weight. After IC, the animals presented typical hypocortisolemia, but cortisol recovered to baseline levels 24 h after an acute dose of ayahuasca; this recovery was not observed in vehicle-treated animals. Additionally, in males, ayahuasca, but not the vehicle, reduced scratching, a stereotypic behavior, and increased feeding. Ayahuasca treatment also improved body weight to baseline levels in both sexes. The ayahuasca-induced behavioral response had long-term effects (14 days). Thus, in this translational juvenile animal model of depression, ayahuasca presented beneficial effects. These results can contribute to the validation of ayahuasca as an antidepressant drug and encourage new studies on psychedelic drugs as a tool for treating mood disorders, including for adolescents with early-onset depression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 133 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 15%
Student > Master 17 13%
Researcher 12 9%
Student > Postgraduate 12 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 8%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 44 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 13%
Neuroscience 13 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 7%
Other 24 18%
Unknown 48 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2021.
All research outputs
#2,275,195
of 22,745,803 outputs
Outputs from Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria
#68
of 841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,389
of 345,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,745,803 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,566 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them