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Fishing out marine parasites? Impacts of fishing on rates of parasitism in the ocean

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, April 2010
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Mentioned by

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Citations

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61 Dimensions

Readers on

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225 Mendeley
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Title
Fishing out marine parasites? Impacts of fishing on rates of parasitism in the ocean
Published in
Ecology Letters, April 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2010.01467.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chelsea L. Wood, Kevin D. Lafferty, Fiorenza Micheli

Abstract

Among anthropogenic effects on the ocean, fishing is one of the most pervasive and extends deepest into the past. Because fishing reduces the density of fish (reducing transmission efficiency of directly transmitted parasites), selectively removes large fish (which tend to carry more parasites than small fish), and reduces food web complexity (reducing transmission efficiency of trophically transmitted parasites), the removal of fish from the world's oceans over the course of hundreds of years may be driving a longterm, global decline in fish parasites. There has been growing recognition in recent years that parasites are a critical part of biodiversity and that their loss could substantially alter ecosystem function. Such a loss may be among the last major ecological effects of industrial fishing to be recognized by scientists.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 225 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
South Africa 3 1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 207 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 52 23%
Researcher 45 20%
Student > Master 32 14%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 12 5%
Other 43 19%
Unknown 16 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 141 63%
Environmental Science 35 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 2%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Other 16 7%
Unknown 21 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2010.
All research outputs
#7,720,711
of 12,352,699 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#1,698
of 1,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,209
of 231,688 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#143
of 163 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,699 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.4. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,688 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 163 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.