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How Vegetation and Sediment Transport Feedbacks Drive Landscape Change in the Everglades and Wetlands Worldwide

Overview of attention for article published in The American Naturalist, September 2010
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Citations

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Title
How Vegetation and Sediment Transport Feedbacks Drive Landscape Change in the Everglades and Wetlands Worldwide
Published in
The American Naturalist, September 2010
DOI 10.1086/655215
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laurel G. Larsen, Judson W. Harvey

Abstract

Mechanisms reported to promote landscape self-organization cannot explain vegetation patterning oriented parallel to flow. Recent catastrophic shifts in Everglades landscape pattern and ecological function highlight the need to understand the feedbacks governing these ecosystems. We modeled feedback between vegetation, hydrology, and sediment transport on the basis of a decade of experimentation. Results from more than 100 simulations showed that flows just sufficient to redistribute sediment from sparsely vegetated sloughs to dense ridges were needed for an equilibrium patterned landscape oriented parallel to flow. Surprisingly, although vegetation heterogeneity typically conveys resilience, in wetlands governed by flow/sediment feedbacks it indicates metastability, whereby the landscape is prone to catastrophic shifts. Substantial increases or decreases in flow relative to the equilibrium condition caused an expansion of emergent vegetation and loss of open-water areas that was unlikely to revert upon restoration of the equilibrium hydrology. Understanding these feedbacks is critical in forecasting wetland responses to changing conditions and designing management strategies that optimize ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration or habitat provision. Our model and new sensitivity analysis techniques address these issues and make it newly apparent that simply returning flow to predrainage conditions in the Everglades may not be sufficient to restore historic landscape patterns and processes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 6%
Italy 2 1%
Mexico 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 141 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 30%
Researcher 28 18%
Student > Master 16 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 13 8%
Professor 13 8%
Other 27 17%
Unknown 15 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 52 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 33 21%
Engineering 11 7%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 20 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2010.
All research outputs
#9,598,601
of 15,090,804 outputs
Outputs from The American Naturalist
#2,539
of 3,088 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,258
of 217,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The American Naturalist
#15
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,090,804 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,088 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.