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Antagonism of the complement component C4 by flavivirus nonstructural protein NS1

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, March 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Citations

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150 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
223 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Antagonism of the complement component C4 by flavivirus nonstructural protein NS1
Published in
The Journal of Experimental Medicine, March 2010
DOI 10.1084/jem.20092545
Pubmed ID
Authors

Panisadee Avirutnan, Anja Fuchs, Richard E. Hauhart, Pawit Somnuke, Soonjeon Youn, Michael S. Diamond, John P. Atkinson

Abstract

The complement system plays an essential protective role in the initial defense against many microorganisms. Flavivirus NS1 is a secreted nonstructural glycoprotein that accumulates in blood, is displayed on the surface of infected cells, and has been hypothesized to have immune evasion functions. Herein, we demonstrate that dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), and yellow fever virus (YFV) NS1 attenuate classical and lectin pathway activation by directly interacting with C4. Binding of NS1 to C4 reduced C4b deposition and C3 convertase (C4b2a) activity. Although NS1 bound C4b, it lacked intrinsic cofactor activity to degrade C4b, and did not block C3 convertase formation or accelerate decay of the C3 and C5 convertases. Instead, NS1 enhanced C4 cleavage by recruiting and activating the complement-specific protease C1s. By binding C1s and C4 in a complex, NS1 promotes efficient degradation of C4 to C4b. Through this mechanism, NS1 protects DENV from complement-dependent neutralization in solution. These studies define a novel immune evasion mechanism for restricting complement control of microbial infection.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 223 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 210 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 63 28%
Student > Bachelor 38 17%
Researcher 30 13%
Student > Master 30 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 7%
Other 31 14%
Unknown 16 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 82 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 36 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 33 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 2%
Other 20 9%
Unknown 22 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2018.
All research outputs
#967,178
of 14,011,284 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Experimental Medicine
#583
of 9,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,683
of 211,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Experimental Medicine
#4
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,011,284 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,542 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.