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Developing and using quantitative instruments for measuring doctor–patient communication about drugs

Overview of attention for article published in Patient Education & Counseling, July 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
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Title
Developing and using quantitative instruments for measuring doctor–patient communication about drugs
Published in
Patient Education & Counseling, July 2003
DOI 10.1016/s0738-3991(03)00049-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linda Jenkins, Nicky Britten, Fiona Stevenson, Nick Barber, Colin Bradley

Abstract

Previous qualitative work has identified communication problems between doctors and patients in general practice consultations, particularly in relation to prescribing. This study aimed to develop quantitative measures to extend the research and provide instruments for both researchers and practitioners to use in monitoring communication and prescribing. Questionnaires were developed from existing instruments. When used with patients and doctors in a variety of general practices, the instruments appeared to be acceptable and had high response rates. While many consultations were satisfactory in terms of patients' expectations and their experiences with medicines, only 38% did not have any poor outcome. The results using quantitative instruments were similar to but less striking compared to our previous qualitative work. The research was developmental and findings suggest that unnecessary prescribing and problems in communication are more likely to lead to poor outcomes in terms of non-adherence and patients having barriers to using their medication.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 4%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 47 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Master 9 18%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Professor 5 10%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 25%
Social Sciences 10 20%
Psychology 9 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2007.
All research outputs
#5,608,529
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from Patient Education & Counseling
#1,341
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,866
of 350,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient Education & Counseling
#20
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,574 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.