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Magnetoencephalography Demonstrates Multiple Asynchronous Generators During Human Sleep Spindles

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, July 2010
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

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Citations

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Title
Magnetoencephalography Demonstrates Multiple Asynchronous Generators During Human Sleep Spindles
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, July 2010
DOI 10.1152/jn.00198.2010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nima Dehghani, Sydney S. Cash, Andrea O. Rossetti, Chih Chuan Chen, Eric Halgren

Abstract

Sleep spindles are approximately 1 s bursts of 10-16 Hz activity that occur during stage 2 sleep. Spindles are highly synchronous across the cortex and thalamus in animals, and across the scalp in humans, implying correspondingly widespread and synchronized cortical generators. However, prior studies have noted occasional dissociations of the magnetoencephalogram (MEG) from the EEG during spindles, although detailed studies of this phenomenon have been lacking. We systematically compared high-density MEG and EEG recordings during naturally occurring spindles in healthy humans. As expected, EEG was highly coherent across the scalp, with consistent topography across spindles. In contrast, the simultaneously recorded MEG was not synchronous, but varied strongly in amplitude and phase across locations and spindles. Overall, average coherence between pairs of EEG sensors was approximately 0.7, whereas MEG coherence was approximately 0.3 during spindles. Whereas 2 principle components explained approximately 50% of EEG spindle variance, >15 were required for MEG. Each PCA component for MEG typically involved several widely distributed locations, which were relatively coherent with each other. These results show that, in contrast to current models based on animal experiments, multiple asynchronous neural generators are active during normal human sleep spindles and are visible to MEG. It is possible that these multiple sources may overlap sufficiently in different EEG sensors to appear synchronous. Alternatively, EEG recordings may reflect diffusely distributed synchronous generators that are less visible to MEG. An intriguing possibility is that MEG preferentially records from the focal core thalamocortical system during spindles, and EEG from the distributed matrix system.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Canada 2 3%
Korea, Republic of 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 69 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Professor 7 9%
Other 5 7%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 31%
Neuroscience 15 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 17%
Psychology 6 8%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2016.
All research outputs
#7,861,266
of 14,565,263 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#2,925
of 5,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,707
of 213,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#13
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,565,263 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,646 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,546 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.