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Moving specialist care into the community: An initial evaluation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Moving specialist care into the community: An initial evaluation
Published in
Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, October 2008
DOI 10.1258/jhsrp.2008.008049
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bonnie Sibbald, Susan Pickard, Hugh McLeod, David Reeves, Nicola Mead, Islay Gemmell, Joanna Coast, Martin Roland, Brenda Leese

Abstract

To assess the likely impact on patients and local health economies of shifting specialist care from hospitals to the community in 30 demonstration sites in England. The evaluation comprised: interviews with service providers at 30 sites, supplemented by interviews with commissioners, GPs and hospital doctors at 12 sites; economic case studies in six sites; and patient surveys at 30 sites plus at nine conventional outpatient services. Outcomes comprised: staff views of service organization and development, impact on primary and secondary care, and benefits for patients; cost per consultation and cost per patient in new services compared to estimates of the price of services if undertaken by hospitals; patients' views of waiting time, access, quality (technical and interpersonal), coordination and satisfaction. New services required high initial investment in staff, premises and equipment, and the support of hospital consultants. Most new services were added to existing hospital services so expanded capacity. Patient reported waiting times (6.7 versus 10.1 weeks; p = 0.001); technical quality of care (96.2 versus 94.5; p < 0.001), overall satisfaction (88.2 versus 85.4; p = 0.04); and access (72.2 versus 65.8; p = 0.001) were significantly better for new compared to conventional services but there was no significant difference in coordination or interpersonal quality of care. Some service providers expressed concerns about service quality. New services dealt with less complex conditions and undercut the price tariff applied to hospitals thus providing a cost saving to commissioners. There was some concern that expansion of new services might destabilize hospitals. Moving specialist care into the community can improve patient access, particularly when new services are added to existing hospital services. Wider impacts on health care quality, capacity and cost merit closer scrutiny before rollout.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 25%
Researcher 7 22%
Unspecified 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 9%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 34%
Unspecified 4 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Other 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2013.
All research outputs
#1,916,524
of 7,818,357 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
#163
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,713
of 328,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
#4
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,818,357 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.