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Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, April 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 7,737)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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2495 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2587 Mendeley
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7 CiteULike
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Title
Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?
Published in
New Phytologist, April 2008
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02436.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nate McDowell, William T. Pockman, Craig D. Allen, David D. Breshears, Neil Cobb, Thomas Kolb, Jennifer Plaut, John Sperry, Adam West, David G. Williams, Enrico A. Yepez

Abstract

Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced hydraulic failure via stomatal closure, resulting in carbon starvation and a cascade of downstream effects such as reduced resistance to biotic agents. Mortality by hydraulic failure per se may occur for isohydric seedlings or trees near their maximum height. Although anisohydric plants are relatively drought-tolerant, they are predisposed to hydraulic failure because they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins during drought. Elevated temperatures should exacerbate carbon starvation and hydraulic failure. Biotic agents may amplify and be amplified by drought-induced plant stress. Wet multidecadal climate oscillations may increase plant susceptibility to drought-induced mortality by stimulating shifts in hydraulic architecture, effectively predisposing plants to water stress. Climate warming and increased frequency of extreme events will probably cause increased regional mortality episodes. Isohydric and anisohydric water potential regulation may partition species between survival and mortality, and, as such, incorporating this hydraulic framework may be effective for modeling plant survival and mortality under future climate conditions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,587 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 58 2%
Spain 12 <1%
Brazil 10 <1%
Canada 9 <1%
South Africa 9 <1%
Italy 8 <1%
Germany 8 <1%
Australia 8 <1%
France 5 <1%
Other 44 2%
Unknown 2416 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 640 25%
Researcher 496 19%
Student > Master 412 16%
Student > Bachelor 191 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 158 6%
Other 395 15%
Unknown 295 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1128 44%
Environmental Science 695 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 169 7%
Engineering 54 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 1%
Other 96 4%
Unknown 410 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 254. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2021.
All research outputs
#92,377
of 19,982,192 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#10
of 7,737 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#515
of 241,753 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#1
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,982,192 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,737 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,753 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.