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Effectiveness of a behavioural intervention to prevent excessive weight gain during infancy (The Baby Milk Trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, October 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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167 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of a behavioural intervention to prevent excessive weight gain during infancy (The Baby Milk Trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0941-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajalakshmi Lakshman, Fiona Whittle, Wendy Hardeman, Marc Suhrcke, Ed Wilson, Simon Griffin, Ken K Ong

Abstract

Infancy is a period of rapid growth and habit formation and hence could be a critical period for obesity prevention. Excess weight gain during infancy is associated with later obesity and formula-fed babies are more likely to gain excess weight compared to breastfed babies. The primary trial outcome is a change in the weight standard deviation score from birth to 1 year. We will recruit 650 to 700 parents who introduce formula-milk feeds within 14 weeks of their baby's birth to a single (assessor) blind, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial. The focus of the intervention is the caregiver (usually the mother), and the focus of the primary outcome is the infant. The intervention group will receive the behavioural intervention, which aims to reduce formula-milk intake, promote responsive feeding and healthy weaning, and prevent excessive weight gain during infancy. The intervention is based on Social Cognitive Theory and action planning ('implementation intentions'). It consists of three components: (1) a motivational component to strengthen parents' motivation to follow the Baby Milk feeding guidelines, (2) an action planning component to help translate motivation into action, and (3) a coping planning component to help parents deal with difficult situations. It will be delivered by trained facilitators (research nurses) over 6 months through three face-to-face contacts, two telephone contacts and written materials. The control group will have the same number of contacts with facilitators, and general issues about feeding will be discussed. Anthropometric outcomes will be measured by trained research staff, blind to group allocation, at baseline, 6 months and 12 months following standard operating procedures. Validated questionnaires will assess milk intake, temperament, appetite, sleep, maternal quality of life and maternal psychological factors. A 4-day food diary will be completed at 8 months. The results of the trial will help to inform infant feeding guidelines and to understand the links between infant feeding, behaviour, appetite and growth. ISRTCN20814693 . Registration date 13 January 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 167 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 166 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 44 26%
Student > Master 24 14%
Student > Bachelor 21 13%
Researcher 18 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 10%
Other 43 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 50 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 20%
Psychology 18 11%
Social Sciences 12 7%
Other 17 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,779,888
of 7,406,294 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#1,334
of 2,048 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,758
of 323,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#83
of 128 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,406,294 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,048 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,402 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 128 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.