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Human antibody responses to Schistosoma mansoni: does antigen directed, isotype restriction result in the production of blocking antibodies?

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, January 1987
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Title
Human antibody responses to Schistosoma mansoni: does antigen directed, isotype restriction result in the production of blocking antibodies?
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, January 1987
DOI 10.1590/s0074-02761987000800016
Pubmed ID
Authors

David W. Dunne, Anthony J. C. Fulford, Anthony E. Butterworth, David Koech, John H. Ouma

Abstract

After treatment young Kenyan schoolchildren are highly susceptible to reinfection with Schistosoma mansoni. Older children and adults are resistant to reinfection. There is no evidence that this age related resistance is due to a slow development of protective immunological mechanisms, rather, it appears that young children are susceptible because of the presence of blocking antibodies which decline with age, thus allowing the expression of protective responses. Correlations between antibody responses to different stages of the parasite life-cycle suggest that, in young children, antigen directed, isotype restriction of the response against cross-reactive polysaccharide egg antigens results in an ineffectual, or even blocking antibody response to the schistosomulum.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 29%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Professor 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 43%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 14%