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Are Nurses and Auxiliary Healthcare Workers Equally Effective in Delivering Smoking Cessation Support in Primary Care?

Overview of attention for article published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, October 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Are Nurses and Auxiliary Healthcare Workers Equally Effective in Delivering Smoking Cessation Support in Primary Care?
Published in
Nicotine & Tobacco Research, October 2015
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv206
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn Faulkner, Stephen Sutton, James Jamison, Melanie Sloan, Sue Boase, Felix Naughton

Abstract

Smoking cessation support is increasingly delivered in primary care by auxiliary healthcare workers in place of healthcare professionals. However, it is unknown whether this shift might affect the quality and impact of the support delivered. Data from the iQuit in Practice randomized control trial of cessation support in General Practice was used (N=602). Analyses assessed whether cessation adviser type (nurse or healthcare assistant [HCA]) was associated with abstinence (primary outcome: self-reported 2-week point prevalence abstinence at 8 weeks follow-up), the advice delivered during the initial consultation, pharmacotherapies prescribed, patient satisfaction, initial consultation length, and the number and type of interim contacts. There were no statistically significant differences in abstinence for support delivered by HCAs versus nurses at 8 weeks (HCAs 42.8%, nurses 42.6%; unadjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73 to 1.40), or at 4 weeks or 6 months follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences in advice delivered, the types of pharmacotherapies prescribed or patient satisfaction. Compared with nurses, HCA consultations were longer on average (HCAs 23.6 mins, nurses 20.8 mins; p=0.002) and they undertook more interim contacts (HCAs median 2, nurses median 1; p<0.001), with contact more likely to be face-to-face than phone call (HCAs 91.2%, nurses 70.9%; OR=4.23, 95% CI 2.86 to 6.26). HCAs appear equally effective as nurses in supporting smoking cessation, although they do this with greater patient contact. Using auxiliary practitioners to deliver cessation support could free up nurse time and reduce costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 27 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 31%
Librarian 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unspecified 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 10 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 31%
Social Sciences 5 17%
Unspecified 4 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Psychology 3 10%
Other 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2016.
All research outputs
#7,147,870
of 12,029,028 outputs
Outputs from Nicotine & Tobacco Research
#1,400
of 1,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,341
of 346,761 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nicotine & Tobacco Research
#26
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,029,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,761 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.