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Knowledge, attitude and skills before and after a module on pharmaceutical promotion in a Nepalese medical school

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
Knowledge, attitude and skills before and after a module on pharmaceutical promotion in a Nepalese medical school
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-5-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

P Ravi Shankar, Kundan K Singh, Rano M Piryani

Abstract

Pharmaceutical promotion is widespread and can impact prescribing by health professionals. Little research has been conducted on interactions between medical students and the pharmaceutical industry. Teaching about pharmaceutical promotion is inadequate. A survey showed that many schools spend only about two hours teaching this important topic while others spend around six hours. Recently a manual on understanding and responding to promotion has been published by Health Action International (HAI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). From April to August 2011 the department of Clinical Pharmacology at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal conducted a module on pharmaceutical promotion for second year students based on the manual. The module used active learning strategies such as brainstorming sessions, role plays and group activities. The study worked on the hypothesis that a module on pharmaceutical promotion will be effective in improving the knowledge, attitude and skills of medical students regarding pharmaceutical promotion. The impact of the module on knowledge, attitude and skills was tested using a retrospective-pre questionnaire. The scores according to gender and method of financing of medical education before and after the module were compared using appropriate non-parametric tests.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 8 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 40%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2014.
All research outputs
#5,233,735
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#869
of 3,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,654
of 226,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#89
of 293 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,664 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,316 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 293 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.