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Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Pollution, May 2016
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Title
Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon
Published in
Environmental Pollution, May 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.11.047
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ariel S. Lewis, Thomas G. Huntington, Mark C. Marvin-DiPasquale, Aria Amirbahman

Abstract

Wetlands are hotspots for production of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) that can bioaccumulate in the food web. The objective of this study was to determine whether the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or granular activated carbon (GAC) to wetland sediment could reduce MeHg production and bioavailability to benthic organisms. Field mesocosms were installed in a wetland fringing Hodgdon Pond (Maine, USA), and ZVI and GAC were applied. Pore-water MeHg concentrations were lower in treated compared with untreated mesocosms; however, sediment MeHg, as well as total Hg (THg), concentrations were not significantly different between treated and untreated mesocosms, suggesting that smaller pore-water MeHg concentrations in treated sediment were likely due to adsorption to ZVI and GAC, rather than inhibition of MeHg production. In laboratory experiments with intact vegetated sediment clumps, amendments did not significantly change sediment THg and MeHg concentrations; however, the mean pore-water MeHg and MeHg:THg ratios were lower in the amended sediment than the control. In the laboratory microcosms, snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) accumulated less MeHg in sediment treated with ZVI or GAC. The study results suggest that both GAC and ZVI have potential for reducing MeHg bioaccumulation in wetland sediment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 53 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 21%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 13 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 11 20%
Engineering 7 13%
Chemistry 7 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2016.
All research outputs
#11,308,946
of 14,268,610 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Pollution
#3,564
of 5,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,796
of 341,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Pollution
#67
of 131 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,268,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,967 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 131 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.