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Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, February 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, February 2016
DOI 10.1002/etc.3399
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beyer, W. Nelson, Basta, Nicholas T., Chaney, Rufus L., Henry, Paula F. P., Mosby, David E., Rattner, Barnett A., Scheckel, Kirk G., Sprague, Daniel, Weber, John, Sprague, Daniel T., Weber, John S., Beyer, W Nelson, Basta, Nicholas T, Chaney, Rufus L, Henry, Paula F P, Mosby, David E, Rattner, Barnett A, Scheckel, Kirk G

Abstract

Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with phosphorus significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. Bioaccessibility of Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the "Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure" (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the "Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal" method (OSU IVG), the "Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test", the modified "Physiologically Based Extraction Test" and the "Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test." All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter (24%), or present as Pb sulfate (18%). Additional Pb was associated with P (chloropyromorphite, hydroxypyromorphite and tertiary Pb phosphate), and with Pb carbonates, leadhillite (a lead sulfate carbonate hydroxide), and Pb sulfide. The formation of chloropyromorphite reduced the bioavailability of Pb and the amendment of Pb-contaminated soils with P may be a thermodynamically favored means to sequester Pb. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 26%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 3 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 10 37%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Chemistry 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Decision Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2016.
All research outputs
#5,817,872
of 10,691,358 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#1,815
of 3,023 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,961
of 346,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#36
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,691,358 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,023 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,132 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.