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Isotopic Composition of Inorganic Mercury and Methylmercury Downstream of a Historical Gold Mining Region

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, February 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Isotopic Composition of Inorganic Mercury and Methylmercury Downstream of a Historical Gold Mining Region
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, February 2016
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b04413
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick M. Donovan, Joel D. Blum, Michael Bliss Singer, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale, Martin T. K. Tsui

Abstract

We measured total mercury (THg) and monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations and mercury (Hg) isotopic compositions in sediment and aquatic organisms from the Yuba River (California, USA) to identify Hg sources and biogeochemical transformations downstream of a historical gold mining region. Sediment THg concentrations and δ(202)Hg decreased from the upper Yuba Fan to the lower Yuba Fan and the Feather River. These results are consistent with the release of Hg during gold mining followed by downstream mixing and dilution. The Hg isotopic composition of Yuba Fan sediment (δ(202)Hg = -0.38 ± 0.17‰ and Δ(199)Hg = 0.04 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1 SD, n = 7) provides a fingerprint of inorganic Hg (IHg) that could be methylated locally or after transport downstream. The isotopic composition of MMHg in the Yuba River food web was estimated using biota with a range of %MMHg (the percent of THg present as MMHg) and compared to IHg in sediment, algae, and the food web. The estimated δ(202)Hg of MMHg prior to photodegradation (-1.29 to -1.07‰) was lower than that of IHg and we suggest this is due to mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of up to -0.9‰ between IHg and MMHg. This result is in contrast to net positive MDF (+0.4 to +0.8‰) previously observed in lakes, estuaries, coastal oceans, and forests. We hypothesize that this unique relationship could be due to differences in the extent or pathway of biotic MMHg degradation in stream environments.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Student > Master 11 18%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 28%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 25%
Chemistry 8 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,161,178
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,770
of 16,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,258
of 270,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#58
of 201 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,673 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,265 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 201 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.