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Genetic contributions to stability and change in intelligence from childhood to old age

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
66 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
159 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
329 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
Title
Genetic contributions to stability and change in intelligence from childhood to old age
Published in
Nature, January 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature10781
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian J. Deary, Jian Yang, Gail Davies, Sarah E. Harris, Albert Tenesa, David Liewald, Michelle Luciano, Lorna M. Lopez, Alan J. Gow, Janie Corley, Paul Redmond, Helen C. Fox, Suzanne J. Rowe, Paul Haggarty, Geraldine McNeill, Michael E. Goddard, David J. Porteous, Lawrence J. Whalley, John M. Starr, Peter M. Visscher

Abstract

Understanding the determinants of healthy mental ageing is a priority for society today. So far, we know that intelligence differences show high stability from childhood to old age and there are estimates of the genetic contribution to intelligence at different ages. However, attempts to discover whether genetic causes contribute to differences in cognitive ageing have been relatively uninformative. Here we provide an estimate of the genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in intelligence across most of the human lifetime. We used genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 1,940 unrelated individuals whose intelligence was measured in childhood (age 11 years) and again in old age (age 65, 70 or 79 years). We use a statistical method that allows genetic (co)variance to be estimated from SNP data on unrelated individuals. We estimate that causal genetic variants in linkage disequilibrium with common SNPs account for 0.24 of the variation in cognitive ability change from childhood to old age. Using bivariate analysis, we estimate a genetic correlation between intelligence at age 11 years and in old age of 0.62. These estimates, derived from rarely available data on lifetime cognitive measures, warrant the search for genetic causes of cognitive stability and change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 329 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 15 5%
United Kingdom 8 2%
Japan 8 2%
Spain 3 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
Poland 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Other 11 3%
Unknown 273 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 83 25%
Researcher 68 21%
Student > Master 47 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 30 9%
Professor 27 8%
Other 74 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 132 40%
Psychology 71 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 36 11%
Unspecified 30 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 4%
Other 47 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2016.
All research outputs
#159,893
of 12,408,021 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#12,028
of 64,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,759
of 222,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#196
of 1,032 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,408,021 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 64,886 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,846 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,032 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.