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Mercury Concentrations in Eggs of Red-Winged Blackbirds and Tree Swallows Breeding in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, January 2016
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Title
Mercury Concentrations in Eggs of Red-Winged Blackbirds and Tree Swallows Breeding in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota
Published in
Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00244-016-0263-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin W. Tyser, Kristofer R. Rolfhus, James G. Wiener, Steve K. Windels, Thomas W. Custer, Paul M. Dummer

Abstract

Most investigations of the environmental effects of mercury (Hg) have focused on aquatic food webs that include piscivorous fish or wildlife. However, recent investigations have shown that other species, including passerine songbirds, may also be at risk from exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). We quantified Hg concentrations in eggs of two species of songbirds, red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), nesting in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA. Geometric mean concentrations of total Hg (THg) were lower in red-winged blackbird eggs [218 and 107 ng/g dry weight (dw) for 2012 and 2013, respectively] than in tree swallow eggs (228 and 300 ng/g dw for 2012 and 2013, respectively), presumably reflecting differences in the trophic positions of these two species. Concentrations of MeHg averaged 98.4 % of THg in red-winged blackbird eggs. Levels of THg observed in this study were well below critical toxicological benchmarks commonly applied to eggs of avian species, suggesting these breeding populations were not adversely affected by exposure to MeHg. In red-winged blackbirds, concentrations of THg in eggs collected in 2012 were twice those in eggs collected in 2013. Hg levels in eggs of both species increased with date of clutch initiation. In red-winged blackbirds, for example, temporal patterns showed that a 3-week delay in clutch initiation increased egg THg by 60 %. These observations indicate that in ovo exposure of wetland birds to MeHg can vary significantly within nesting season as well as between years.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 6 30%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 35%
Environmental Science 5 25%
Unspecified 1 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2016.
All research outputs
#12,800,262
of 14,483,684 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#1,386
of 1,740 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,722
of 267,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#20
of 38 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,740 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.