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Impacts of climate change on the future of biodiversity

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, January 2012
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
2672 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
Title
Impacts of climate change on the future of biodiversity
Published in
Ecology Letters, January 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01736.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bellard C, Bertelsmeier C, Leadley P, Thuiller W, Courchamp F, Bellard, Céline, Bertelsmeier, Cleo, Leadley, Paul, Thuiller, Wilfried, Courchamp, Franck, Céline Bellard, Cleo Bertelsmeier, Paul Leadley, Wilfried Thuiller, Franck Courchamp

Abstract

Many studies in recent years have investigated the effects of climate change on the future of biodiversity. In this review, we first examine the different possible effects of climate change that can operate at individual, population, species, community, ecosystem and biome scales, notably showing that species can respond to climate change challenges by shifting their climatic niche along three non-exclusive axes: time (e.g. phenology), space (e.g. range) and self (e.g. physiology). Then, we present the principal specificities and caveats of the most common approaches used to estimate future biodiversity at global and sub-continental scales and we synthesise their results. Finally, we highlight several challenges for future research both in theoretical and applied realms. Overall, our review shows that current estimates are very variable, depending on the method, taxonomic group, biodiversity loss metrics, spatial scales and time periods considered. Yet, the majority of models indicate alarming consequences for biodiversity, with the worst-case scenarios leading to extinction rates that would qualify as the sixth mass extinction in the history of the earth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,672 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 50 2%
Brazil 35 1%
United Kingdom 27 1%
France 25 <1%
Germany 24 <1%
Canada 18 <1%
Australia 12 <1%
Spain 9 <1%
South Africa 9 <1%
Other 97 4%
Unknown 2366 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 608 23%
Researcher 555 21%
Student > Master 484 18%
Student > Bachelor 391 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 134 5%
Other 500 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1479 55%
Environmental Science 734 27%
Unspecified 144 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 100 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 54 2%
Other 161 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 104. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2018.
All research outputs
#109,015
of 11,375,424 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#52
of 1,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,621
of 264,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#1
of 171 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,375,424 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,855 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,671 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 171 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.